Hunger and Obesity Are Food Security Issues ….

…. Or we can also define them as the visible outcomes of the failure of our global Food Security System…

The U.N. says nearly a billion people go to bed hungry every night. At the same time, hundreds of millions of others are obese. To solve those twin crises, we will need to know who is wielding the power over food and marketing.

Raj Patel (http://rajpatel.org/), author of Stuffed and Starved: The Hidden Battle for the World Food System (http://rajpatel.org/2009/10/27/stuffed-and-starved/) says hunger and obesity are not just a matter of eating too little or too much. It has to do with what people are eating and the systems and institutions driving consumption.
To summarize his analysis and to add some of our thoughts:

There’s growing investment in agriculture around the world to feed an expected population of 9 billion by 2050. But as emerging economies grow in Africa and Asia, consumers in those regions are switching to a more Western diet. It’s a diet many blame for obesity, as well as diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, many others say that people have a choice as to what to eat. They don’t have to buy foods rich in fat, salt and sugar.

And are we really having the choice?

Patel said that’s no.

“When you look at the amount of money that is spent promoting food, the ratio of good food to junk food marketing is about 1 to 500. In other words, for every dollar that’s spent promoting fresh fruits and vegetables 500 is spent promoting junk food,” he said.

And this discrepancy means so much to us with the London Olympic Games that is approaching. All the big food companies are partners of this major event…. Sport is associated with junk food and not with healthy food or healthy eating behaviors.

Again for this Olympic Games, we won’t see an encouragement for healthy nutrition and how this combination – sport and good nutrition – can have a dramatic impact on health. So important for the future of children… Unbelievable!

The battle seems to be lost in advance…

Just a handful of corporations control much of the global food market. It raises the question of what’s considered normal eating?
It is true. “You have kids growing up who think it is normal to be drinking 32 ounces of soda, basically sugar and empty calories. Children who are disconnected from where their food comes from and who are being raised in some very unhealthy eating habits.” Patel said.

Evidence can clearly be found in the United States as well as in some emerging countries like Mexico, India and South Africa.

For example:

• “One in three children who were born in the year 2000 will develop type 2 diabetes. And if we’re talking about children of people of color then that’s near a one in two children will develop type 2 diabetes,”

• “India is a country that’s suffering [from] an epidemic of hunger at the same time as an epidemic of the kinds of disease that used to only happen in rich economies”.

And this is an interesting question …… what can we consider as normal eating?

Is it the same everywhere in the world or do we have major differences based on food tradition, culinary culture as well as genetic background? Can we have a universal approach to this concept?

And finally, if we take the example of Canada, country where CKi is located – what is the legitimacy of having one unique food guidance policy in a country where there are so much different ethnic groups? Recent studies have shown a dramatic level of metabolic diseases in the new immigrant population in Canada. These are some of the questions we ask and we try to answer.

In fact, modern diets are often very different from what our ancestors ate and a lot of people around the world are currently eating. Diversity in food, respect of the tradition around food as well as the culinary culture are keen and we need to value them.

There is hope for better nutrition.

“There’s an amazing kind of rebirth of the food movement in the United States and around the world of people who are excited to be reconnecting with growing their own food, with eating locally and sustainably and organically. And that’s a fight that’s well worth talking about as well, because it’s a way of reducing some of the problems associated with diabetes – the diseases of the modern food system,” he said.

Personally, I was amazed to find a local organization in Port-au-Prince – Buy Local Haiti (Kore Pwodiksyon Lokal – http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=npvx4F9JZyo) that advocates for good food and educates people to eat well based on their culture and tradition and this, despite the socio-economic difficulties in Haiti.

I met these people and I learnt a lot about the importance of the food movement, dignity and human rights, more importantly in countries like Haiti overwhelmed by American rice. In fact before 1970s, Haitian people ate rice only one time/week (mostly on Sunday); nowadays and as a result of the cheap American rice availability, it became the unique daily dish.

Buy Local Haiti has made a video showing a weekly menu based on Haitian culture and tradition. This weekly menu contains only one-time meal with rice. This was a great success on the Haitian TV….. People had water in their mouth!  It reminded them their childhood. They saw that it is possible to eat differently.

Consumers and communities around the world are realizing they have a health and economic crisis on their hands linked to diet. Patel says they’re taking action by defining their own food and agriculture policies. Haiti is also part of this movement! There is hope for a better future….

Source: http://www.voanews.com/content/decapua-food-power-27jun12/1253203.html

To read more about Raj Patel: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/world/who-says-raj-patel-is-the-messiah/article566168/

http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2007/sep/15/healthmindandbody.health

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4 responses to “Hunger and Obesity Are Food Security Issues ….

  1. Pingback: Can Fast Food Be Healthy | Freelance Blog Writing

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